This week on Everything is Fine

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We’ve got my old friend, graphic designer Bonnie Siegler, on the show: in addition to working with such dream clients as Late Night with Seth Meyers, the New Yorker, the Criterion Collection, Random House, 30 Rock, Sex and the City, and This American Life, Bonnie co-designed the prototype for Lucky and its test issue too. Bonnie walks us through creative partnerships, staying inventive and ambitious —and what it finally took to strike out on her own. Listen in on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts.

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11 Thoughts on This week on Everything is Fine
    cw
    8 Nov 2021
    10:57am

    What a great podcast! I hope y’all have Bonnie back when her book is published. As for curly hair…I know you don’t like it on you, Kim, but truly I think the right stylist can make all the difference. Here’s a tip to pass along…this is a suggestion that was given to a friend of mine and it worked wonders for her––take along someone you trust to take good iPhone photos to a wig store that caters to strippers––try on a variety of hair styles and cuts and have your “photographer” take four photos of you in each wig from the shoulders up––front, right, left and the all important full length as well. Don’t look at them for at least a couple of days then scroll through with fresh eyes. (a wig store that caters to strippers because they have more interesting hair styles)

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      Darcy
      9 Nov 2021
      6:46pm

      I fully agree: that was a great podcast!

      Respectfully, CW, although Kim’s hair is lovely, for some people with curly hair like mine (that is also thick, bushy, occasionally frizzy, etc)—no one would ever create such an unflattering wig in the first place. I’m sure there are nice wigs I could try on, but not ones that represent the hair underneath.

      And whereas the idea about finding the right cut/stylist is encouraging, it’s sadly not realistic. Stylists aren’t magicians. So until they are, we have enormous gratitude for flat irons, curling irons, blowdryers, and chemical straighteners. (did I mention hats? ha)

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    Jax
    9 Nov 2021
    11:00pm

    Haven’t listened to this one yet, but I really enjoyed the last Kim+Jenn-only “Peak Ma’am” episode where Jenn vented about a number of subjects. I esp. loved it when you talked about the conundrum of how to dress/be sexy while older (without lots of cleavage or legs, etc.). You mentioned Goldie Hawn in First Wives Club as one good example of sexy older. I feel like there’s a good number of inspiring sexy older (40+) women role models now — Emma Thompson (love that she doesn’t give a f-), Isabelle Huppert (can I include the French please! Huppert is almost impeccable), Charlotte Rampling, Mary J Blige, Diane Keaton (too trite a choice?!?), Naomi Watts, Sharon Horgan (any number of her outfits on Catastrophe and This Way Up), Kathryn Hahn, Michelle Yeoh, Michelle Pfeiffer, Jennifer Connelly, Rachel Weisz, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Rose Byrne, Thandiwe Newton, Sandrine Holt, Chloe Sevigny, Lisa Bonet, Juliette Binoche (carefree, not uptight), Saffron Burrows (Mozart in the Jungle). Even Sofia Coppola (my personal style icon) is 50 now. Kristin Scott Thomas too and she didn’t change her style drastically from her late 20s till now. I do think it’s difficult for more busty, curvy women (I’m one) to not look matronly when older. It’s a delicate line to walk. I’m sure I’ve forgotten some women here. I also loved your banter about Seth Rogen and agree 100% that he’s gotten hot.

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    Mimi A
    8 Nov 2021
    10:23pm

    Great episode and loved Bonnie Siegler. When it comes to hair, Candice Bergen wrote the best line in one of her memoirs: “In my sixties I seem to have gotten someone else’s hair:perhaps Golda Meier’s.” I had pretty shoulder length or longer hair from the time I was old enough to successfully refuse the haircuts my mother tried to force me to get. I thought I’d become an old lady with a bun in my dotage, and never understood why everyone said long hair didn’t look good on older women. Why cut it short, exposing more of your face and neck just when your jawline was softening? And then I got it. There are exceptions, but long hair usually does drag your face down after 60 or so. I also noticed that the thick, bouncy tresses I’d long taken for granted had disappeared, only to be replaced by finer, wispier strands. It took a long time for me to stop missing my long hair, but eventually I began to think many middle aged women with long hair looked like escapees from a Real Housewives set. When hair is longer than the shoulders it decorates your upper body, but doesn’t really flatter your face. Of course this is one woman’s opinion and everyone should wear their hair in any style that makes them happy. But if I were you Kim, I’d find a style that’s becoming and manageable, even if it has some wave to it. Spiky bobs or shags styled with a flatiron can be Patti Smith edgy. Pinterest has loads of pictures of chin length and shorter cuts that are cool, sexy and definitely not bad Mom hairdos. Change is hard, but sometimes good.

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      Jax
      9 Nov 2021
      9:39pm

      Agree. Every woman should do whatever she feels like, of course, but I think Sarah Jessica Parker would look tons better if she abandoned the too-long, straight-hanging hair she’s been wearing for a long time. I’m thinking a cute curly bob like her hair in Season 4 of SATC.

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        Clare
        11 Nov 2021
        11:26am

        And I have about 100 photos of her long hair saved as my style inspo, I think she looks great.

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    sc
    8 Nov 2021
    3:46pm

    “If men went through menopause, we’d have to stand up and say a pledge to it.”

    Legit LOL

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    melsybelsy
    8 Nov 2021
    7:23pm

    Very cool guest – aspirational in so many ways – please do an episode on her book!! Very cool conversation between Kim & Jenn- relatable in so many ways. Please go on about your hair as this is a THING as we get older. I want to see your short college badass hair Kim. Just saying.

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    Rae
    8 Nov 2021
    7:03pm

    This was a wonderful episode in every way.

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    Sheila
    9 Nov 2021
    7:05pm

    This episode really resonated with me- in fact, I listened to the intro hair conversation twice. The struggle is real. I have naturally curly hair that is still pretty thick at (almost) 53, and maybe 40% grey so also colored. I flirted with stopping color during lockdown but after 4 months concluded I look more alive without the grey around my face. But I did cut off 8″ because that look on me no longer felt right. I’m now shoulder-grazing and want to go back to that 80’s short Kim mentioned- and I also had- but am worried I’ll just look frumps and dowdy. I HATE how much mental space this always takes up, day in and day out, for years now.

    I can tell you that my husband spends approximately ZERO time thinking about his next hair move. Ugh.

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    Allison
    11 Nov 2021
    9:42am

    Great show. Love hearing from people who’s work I’ve admired but didn’t know much about. Also enjoyed Hair Talk. After much hand-wringing I got a short haircut recently and I’m here to say that I love it. I have similar hair texture to what Kim describes and I’ve tried to make medium length hair work for a long time. I’m 51 and have been through the hair rollercoaster of lush mane/shedding ever since my first pregnancy at 33. Most days my hair ended up in a bun and it was starting to get thin around my hairline. My short is very easy to take care of but still edgy and feminine. I use Seen Blow Dry Cream and whatever wax or pomade product my sons bring home from the barbershop for a little texture. My new look also compliments my 12 year old prep school boy wardrobe of mostly button down shirts and crew neck sweaters that I wore in the 1980s. Full circle moment.

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About

Kim France

I was born in Houston, Texas in 1964 and have lived in New York City since 1988. I had a long career in magazines, working at Sassy, Elle, New York, and Spin, and in 2000, I founded Lucky magazine, which I edited for ten years.

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