This week on Everything is Fine

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Jenn and I chat with my Brooklyn neighbor Jaime Lowe, author of the memoir Mental, about living with bipolar disorder, and also the more recent Breathing Fire, about California female inmate firefighters, and our conversation is far-ranging and—if I do say so—pretty intense. Listen in on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. And you might want to join our Patreon too, because we’ve got all sorts of fantastic and exclusive content headed your way this fall.

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9 Thoughts on This week on Everything is Fine
    Lisa
    14 Sep 2021
    8:03am

    As someone who takes 5 daily pills just so I can live my life (because without them I will have been dead pretty soon), I was quite surprised to hear Jen’s commiseration about being consistent with meds. I am not going to say “grow up” because I heard the previous episodes and realize Jen is having a hard time “adulting” ( – a term I find childish); but please – get a grip on yourself and do what needs to be done, without endless talk and going deep into whatever.

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      Kim France
      14 Sep 2021
      9:48am

      We’ve all got our struggles, Lisa—I’d guess you do too—but not all of us are as brave as Jenn consistently is in sharing them with a wider audience. I understand your point, but it sure lacks compassion to me.

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        melsybelsy
        15 Sep 2021
        7:15am

        Jenn is incredibly relatable (as are you Kim)- and I love how brave she is when she names things she’s working through because It’s things I’m sometimes working through myself. My 15 year old son walked in on me listening to this particular episode, raised an eyebrow and I declared both of you as women who get my sh*t – if he doesn’t like it – he can just walk away.

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      DeDe
      14 Sep 2021
      11:13am

      Speaking as someone else who has to take meds in order to live, while I can understand your frustration, you kinda have to admit that remembering to take medication for a serious health issue is entirely different from remembering to take vitamin D or fish oil. You know? Like, if forgetting to take a thing isn’t going to result in immediate, mortal consequences, can’t you sort of get why the inconsistancy happens? Especially if you already have a gajillion other things on your plate, including all of your own mental health challenges?

      Part of being a mature adult is also having some empathy for other people in all their flawed, human glory. We all have our shit. She has hers, you have yours. Try to keep ‘em separate.

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        Lisa
        14 Sep 2021
        1:11pm

        As someone who works with children who have been molested – mostly raped really – by a household member, my capacity for compassion has a limit, I guess. What irks me is that there is no measure, but that is a different discussion which I do not want to get into here.

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    cw
    14 Sep 2021
    7:58am

    Great podcast! Intriguing, interesting and informative––what more could anyone want!! I’m glad you’re feeling better, Kim. I do believe that menopause leads to all kinds of body changes and weirdnesses. As to exercise…for a long time I have believed that people generally have a particular kind of exercise that works best for them. It could be swimming in the bay (like your mom!), pilates, yoga, running, power walking etc. etc. And that particular kind of exercise that works best for you changes with the decades and with the changes a woman’s body goes through. So if your particular exercise routine has become boring or is no longer working it might help to step back and try something else and keep trying something else until you find the kind of exercise that speaks to your body. I have a friend who swims, one who jazzercises, one who power walks and one who runs and I do pilates. My one rule of thumb is whatever new thing you try––try it for at least one month (2-3 months is even better) before you dump it and try something else. Sorry for going on so…stepping away from the soapbox…

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    EA
    22 Sep 2021
    9:23am

    Thank you for this episode. I’ve been on a mental health journey for 20 years. Although I’ve been on antidepressants for what feels like forever, like Kim, I recently had a reaction to a new antidepressant that led to an atypical mania and an a bipolar 2 diagnosis. At age 46. I have such mixed emotions about this. Relief. Regret. Anger. Frustration. Sadness. Kim – I am a longtime listener of the podcast and have admired you and your career for years. Thank you for sharing your experience. It meant a lot to this listener.

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    Heather
    23 Sep 2021
    6:43pm

    Thank you for this episode. I just listened, even though I was afraid to. One of my dearest friends has untreated bipolar, has lost her job, and now lives in a van in Arizona and spouts Qanon-adjacent theories. Jaime’s discussion of her illness, and especially her descriptions of what it’s like to be in mania, gave me more insight into my friend’s condition. Jaime, thanks for bravely sharing your story, and thanks for facilitating, Kim and Jen.

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    Cynthia
    29 Sep 2021
    8:30pm

    Thanks so much for this terrific episode – I really appreciated the frank discussion about mental illness. Jaime’s book Mental is remarkable, and I loved getting to hear her talk about it and her new book, too.

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About

Kim France

I was born in Houston, Texas in 1964 and have lived in New York City since 1988. I had a long career in magazines, working at Sassy, Elle, New York, and Spin, and in 2000, I founded Lucky magazine, which I edited for ten years.

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