This podcast episode is one not to miss

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Like so many of you, my podcast partner Tally and I have been deeply affected by George Floyd’s murder at the hands of the police, and the subsequent unrest across the country and world. We wondered what we might be able to contribute to the conversation, and decided to invite TV writer, author, and friend of the show Danielle Henderson back on after we saw this powerful monologue, which Danielle posted on her Instagram, and which has been viewed, last I checked, over 300,000 times. We let Danielle set the agenda, and the resulting conversation is tough, thought-provoking, and even a little encouraging. Do listen in on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts.

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14 Thoughts on This podcast episode is one not to miss
    Liz
    10 Jun 2020
    10:55am

    I loved this podcast. I think the woman Danielle quote as saying “you’re lucky black people want equality and not revenge” is this woman, and I highly recommend watching her full speech, especially if you are one of those liberals who support the protests but questioned or denounced the looting. It’s so powerful:

    https://youtu.be/7WUs1R8-tHQ

    Also, as a feminist who wasted a lot of my 20’s trying to educate men about feminism on the internet, I so related to Danielle’s “The information is all available to you. It is not my job to educate you” stance. Yep, I wish I’d realized what she did sooner, that they don’t know these things because they don’t want to know them.

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    Candace
    9 Jun 2020
    1:58pm

    Thank you for this. It cuts through so many things so clearly – sharing with my non-POC friends, family and peers. I’m hoping this opens up some pathways to necessary conversations.

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    Tanya Hahni
    9 Jun 2020
    2:06pm

    I’m looking forward to listening! I only know Danielle’s work a little bit from her relationship with Julie Klausner but I look forward to reading and listening to more of it. C.W.’s comment about a sense of confusion is one I think many of us can relate to. I have been spending the last week slowly finding black voices that resonate with me and who I trust to be thoughtful. They are talking about difficult topics and I am glad to have added them to my media feed while deleting some of the less constructive voices. I’m grateful to be part of the GOACA community.

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    Amanda
    9 Jun 2020
    12:04pm

    YES! Thank you so much for hosting this conversation. This is so important. THIS IS OUR SHARED WORK. Keep it up, I love what you all are doing on the podcast!
    xxoo

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    Jan
    9 Jun 2020
    11:43am

    I’ve really appreciated Danielle’s clarity, in her Instagram stories, and here. Thank you for giving her this space again, and thanks to Danielle for her honesty, and sharing her truth. Much gratitude!

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    c.w.
    9 Jun 2020
    11:13am

    I hope everyone gets the opportunity to listen to this podcast. It’s also simple to message it to others (which I did). All of this conversation (both Ms. Henderson’s video and the podcast) is helpful learning. There are some things I’m still confused about because there are some things that can’t be generalized i.e. I immediately deleted on Instagram my black square #blacklivesmatter post because of the podcast even though someone else––also a female of color––told me she thought it was empowering to see so many black squares posted ergo I felt weird about deleting it, but at the same time I felt I should because the woman of color I was discussing this with was brown and not black. Also, the feeling of being paralyzed has been major for me so I was glad you brought that up, Kim.

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    Heather
    9 Jun 2020
    10:22am

    Thank you for this. I loved her video, and am looking forward to the podcast.

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    sc
    9 Jun 2020
    6:17pm

    Excellent.

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    Viajera
    9 Jun 2020
    10:17pm

    If anyone finds the monologue in transcript form, please post a link here. I’d love to read it but I’m not on Insta (it is sort of on my to do list … but i haven’t done it yet ). I tried googling but didn’t find a text. Sorry if it is rude to say you are not on Instagram or ask for transcripts – that’s exactly the kind of thing I don’t know. Ha, among other things.

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    melsybelsy
    9 Jun 2020
    9:34pm

    I’ve been a HUGE fangirl of Danielle since her last podcast episode. I’m so happy you brought her back. I work closely with women of color in the education field and when we started doing racial affinity work last year and I built up enough trust with one of my colleagues to have an honest conversation about race, all the things came out. The not being able to travel to certain parts of the country, the always being on guard, the constantly being put on the spot to have to be the explainer of all things culturally relevant when it is a HUGE emotional drain that brings up trauma. Danielle expresses all of that and more with candor and grace. I immediately shared this post to my moms group on facebook that’s chock full of white UMC women. Bravo! This again, is one of the podcasts out there right now 🙂 Thanks for doing what you do.

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    Rae
    9 Jun 2020
    10:56pm

    Kim, you and Tally are really hitting it out of the park! The stand outs for me this time: you and Tally were willing to ask awkward questions and Danielle was willing to voice her anger. Thank you! Maybe you can convince Danielle to be a regular?

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    nadine
    11 Jun 2020
    11:52am

    Loved this episode!!

    Thank you so much to all three of you!

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    Lisa
    10 Jun 2020
    11:45pm

    “We let Danielle set the agenda…”

    – Danielle set the agenda and…
    – We asked Danielle to set the agenda and…
    – We all agreed Danielle would set the agenda…

    One sentence. It seems so small but conveys an undercurrent of Kim’s and Tally’s throughout.

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      Lisa
      10 Jun 2020
      11:50pm

      And perhaps this post could be a “Link” instead of a “Digression”

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About

Kim France

I was born in Houston, Texas in 1964 and have lived in New York City since 1988. I had a long career in magazines, working at Sassy, Elle, New York, and Spin, and in 2000, I founded Lucky magazine, which I edited for ten years.

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