Consider the clog sandal

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Cool though it may be, the clog is not a pretty shoe. It is galumphy and unfeminine in the extreme; the kind of footwear that can be styled to look cool, but rarely to look seriously good. I do like clog sandals, however. They are walkable and fun, and while they might not be the most delicate shoes in your summer arsenal, they will be among those you reach for most. I’m considering this Loeffler Randall pair: it’s on the splurgy side, but the tri-colored straps—three great neutrals that go great together—would work with just about any color.

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This very classic natural leather pair suggests the 70s, but does not feel stuck there.

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Such strappy kick-around-on-the-weekend fun, and with some real height. Plus, the fact that these are a nice blue keeps all those straps from feeling too dark and clunky.

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Brooklyn’s own Nina Z makes a small line of cute clogs at decent prices, and if you’re in the borough, you can always find them on weekends at the Brooklyn Flea. That’s where I discovered this pair, which after two summers, I have worn into the ground. You can barely see this shoe’s best detail in this picture: it’s a seam coming straight up the middle of the front of the ankle strap, and it’s quite chic.

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Possibly the most dressed-up clog sandals in the brief history of clog sandals, in fancy silver metallic leather.

 

Reader request: Whither Dr. Scholl’s exercise sandals?

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A reader named Leslie got in touch in to say she was having a hard time tracking  them down: “These appear not to be available anymore,” she wrote. “How can it be?” I believed it couldn’t possibly—and felt a generational obligation to investigate.*

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Leslie had no cause for concern. Dr. Scholl’s Exercise Sandals still very much exist, although most of the newer models aren’t going to please purists: the soles are darker and look synthetic, its classic lines have been messed with, and the sole has a rubbery middle layer. All of this combines rather unfortunately to make them look like Dr. Scholl’s knockoffs instead of the real thing. For those, you’ll need to turn to our old friends at the Vermont Country Store where they’ve them in all their jolie laide glory, in blue, beige, and white, just like you remember them.

 

The ad is from a vintage issue of Seventeen, and I’m trying to figure out precisely how vintage: what do you say, guys?  78? 79? Possibly early, early 80s? That short denim skirt is throwing me off, but the parted-down-the-center-feathered hair of the guy to the left is pure 1978.